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The Riggs Blog

The Riggs Blog is a mix of news about clinical work, research and educational activities from the Austen Riggs Center, as well as a source for information beyond our walls that we find interesting and thought-provoking. Senior clinical experts, researchers, and editors review all clinical content on this blog before it is published.

  • Measuring Psychological Pain to Improve Clinical Research and Care  - Dr. Katie Lewis on the Austen Riggs Blog.

    Austen Riggs Center Research Psychologist Katie Lewis, PhD, was the lead author on a paper recently published in the Archives of Suicide Research titled, “Assessment of Psychological Pain in Clinical and Non-Clinical Samples: A Preliminary Investigation Using the Psychic Pain Scale.” This interview with Dr. Lewis that explores some of the paper’s findings.  

  • The Austen Riggs Center is a top psychiatric hospital located in Stockbridge, MA.

    Initiated by the scholarship’s namesake and continued in her honor by the Erikson Institute of the Austen Riggs Center, the Evelyn Stefansson Nef Scholarship is awarded annually (since 2000) to students from Lenox Memorial High School, Monument Mountain High School, and Lee High School who are selected for their record of academic excellence throughout the high school years, stated intention to study social sciences or pre-medical studies in a four-year college program, and demonstrated leadership in community service. 

  • The Austen Riggs Center's staff are involved in multidisciplinary treatment teams.

    Dr. Hunter-Schaedle has been accepted to present a poster about this topic at the Public Responsibility in Medicine and Research (PRIMR) 2020 Advancing Ethical Research Conference, which will take place virtually in December 2020. Her poster is titled: “The View from a Tiny House: Adapting Our Small IRB Operation in Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic.”          

  • Michael Groat, PhD is a member of the Austen Riggs Center 1919 Society and a former Fellow.

    Former Austen Riggs Center Fellow Michael Groat, PhD, describes what it means to be a planned giving 1919 Society member. 

  • Austen Riggs Center Research Psychologist Dr. Katie Lewis talks about the impact of sleep on mental health and offers some tips to improve your sleep. 

  • Celebrating 100 years of lives reclaimed at the Austen Riggs Center in Stockbridge, MA.

    July 21, 2020 marks the official end of the Austen Riggs Center’s centennial year, a landmark that we are proud of and humbled by–we could not have achieved it or celebrated it without the help, support, and work of so many dedicated individuals.  

  • Margaret Parish, PhD, reflects on the helpful and less-helpful aspects of relying on Zoom in a residential treatment center. 

    When the COVID-19 pandemic hit, we had to adapt quickly. Both the virus and our adaptations to it shook the foundations of the Riggs community. The virus turns every person into a potential hazard to every other person; anyone could be a silent unwitting conduit. So many people already harbor anxiety about being harmed by others or about accidentally harming them–this harm is now perilously close to becoming real. The virus becomes a symbol for the dangers of other people.  

  • Is there Evidence that Psychoanalytic Treatment Works?

    Austen Riggs Center Medical Director/CEO Eric M. Plakun, MD, talks about what psychotherapy can expect after the COVID-19 pandemic.  

  • You are invited to participate in a research study on experiences of loneliness and boredom in response to social distancing related to the novel COVID-19 virus pandemic, entitled “Loneliness and Social Distancing.”

    Austen Riggs Center Research Psychologist Katie Lewis, PhD, provides an update on her Loneliness and Social Distancing Research Study. 

     

  • The risk factors for suicide–isolation, unemployment, substance abuse, the presence of guns in the house, and so on–are all up during COVID-19.

    The theme of this fourth and final 4x4@4:00 “Talking It Through” session was disruption/re-thinking. The number of disruptions mentioned was striking, and many of them require us to re-think things we have “taken for granted.”

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