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The Riggs Blog

The Riggs Blog is a mix of news about clinical work, research and educational activities from the Austen Riggs Center, as well as a source for information beyond our walls that we find interesting and thought-provoking. Senior clinical experts, researchers, and editors review all clinical content on this blog before it is published.

  • Why Paid Parental Leave Matters

    The Board of Trustees of the Austen Riggs Center recently approved a new parental leave policy for Riggs employees that grants new mothers, fathers, and adoptive and foster parents up to nine weeks of fully paid leave (above and beyond any accrued paid time off) during the first year with their new child. 

  • Dr. Krantz is a consultant and researcher from New York City.

    It was a great pleasure to participate in a day-long symposium this past July in honor of Dr. Wesley Carr, which was devoted to exploring institutional integrity. The presenters offered fascinating perspectives on institutional integrity, each drawing on their own experiences to shed light on the dilemmas and challenges of living up to the ideals of integrity within the complex, cross-cutting pressures leaders and managers face today.

  • Erikson Institute

    The Erikson Institute of the Austen Riggs Center is pleased to announce the following two events this week, both free and open the public and both being held at the Austen Riggs Center.

  • Laura M. Morrell, LICSW, is a clinical social worker at the Austen Riggs Center.

    Clinical social work is an integral part of the interdisciplinary psychodynamic treatment approach at the Austen Riggs Center. 

    Hear Laura M. O’Neill, LICSW, speak about the multifaceted role of the clinical social worker at Riggs. 

  • In the recent movie Won’t You Be My Neighbor we see how Fred Rogers calmly and brilliantly engages young people in discussion about very difficult subjects, including death.

    In the recent movie Won’t You Be My Neighbor we see how Fred Rogers calmly and brilliantly engages young people in discussion about very difficult subjects, including death. Using his puppet characters, he addressed the assassination of Robert Kennedy and the Challenger explosion. 

  • Dr. Roy Schafer was a clinical psychologist and psychoanalyst who understood much about psychoanalytic change while living through many changing times.

    Dr. Roy Schafer, a clinical psychologist and psychoanalyst who understood much about psychoanalytic change while living through many changing times, died on August 5, 2018, at the age of 95. He will be remembered for his pioneering work in psychological diagnostic assessment and for his seminal reconceptualization of psychoanalysis in the terms of “action language” in relation to subjective experience.

  • 2017 American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA) National Meeting Call for Poster Submissions

    The American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA) is holding its 2019 National Meeting at the New York Hilton in New York City, February 6-10, 2019. Founded in 1911 and the oldest psychoanalytic organization in the United States, APsaA is a professional organization for psychoanalysts that focuses on education, research, and membership development. 

  • The Austen Riggs Center is focusing some of our research efforts on the issue of suicide.

    Director of the Erikson Institute Dr. Jane G. Tillman and Research Psychologist Dr. Katie Lewis give an overview of the Suicide Research and Education Strategic Initiative at the Austen Riggs Center.

  • Dese’Rae L. Stage gave an interview on suicide prevention and her multi-media suicide survivor portrait and story project Live Through This.

    During a visit to the Austen Riggs Center earlier this year, Dese’Rae L. Stage, photographer, writer, and suicide prevention activist, spoke with us about suicide prevention and Live Through This, a multimedia-based storytelling series that aims to reduce prejudice and discrimination against suicide attempt survivors. 

  • Anne Dailey, J.D., Erikson Scholar

    Anne C. Dailey, JD, reflects on her time at Riggs as an Erikson Scholar and the book she was working on at the time–Law and the Unconscious: A Psychoanalytic Perspective (Yale University Press, 2017).

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