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The Riggs Blog

The Riggs Blog is a mix of news about clinical work, research and educational activities from the Austen Riggs Center, as well as a source for information beyond our walls that we find interesting and thought-provoking. Senior clinical experts, researchers, and editors review all clinical content on this blog before it is published.

  • The Austen Riggs Center provides intensive psychodynamic psychotherapy in a voluntary, open, and non-coercive community.

    The Austen Riggs Center Prize for Excellence in Mental Health Media recognizes a select group of professional journalists, writers, and media professionals who create exemplary work that contributes to the public’s understanding of mental health issues. A prestigious recognition, each prize carries an award of $3,000 and is presented at the Center's annual Fall Conference held in Stockbridge, MA. This year’s conference, “Duality’s End: Computational Psychiatry and the Cognitive Science of Representation,” will be held on September 28-30, 2018.

  • Suicide Awareness Month

    Austen Riggs Center clinician and Director of the Erikson Institute, Dr. Jane G. Tillman, responds to the New York Times article “Suicide Survivor Guilt.”

  • The Austen Riggs Center offers fitness instruction to the patients as an integrated approach to health.

    Austen Riggs Center’s Dr. Heather Churchill talks about the health and wellness offerings that patients have access to while in treatment. 

  • Psychotherapy

    We focus on the whole person, including the trauma. “We try to learn from a person’s relationships—past and present. We try to understand the thoughts, feelings, and behaviors that come up in relationships, some of which otherwise might sabotage treatment,” she says.  People with complex trauma histories often become reactive to relationships in ways they don’t understand. We try to help them understand and organize themselves so they can stay in treatment and approach their trauma in a safe way. 

  • Dr. Christina Biedermann, staff psychologist at Austen Riggs Center

    “Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is the body’s physical and emotional response to extreme stress,” explains Dr. Christina Biedermann, staff psychologist at Austen Riggs Center.  That stress is triggered by a life-threatening event, either a single incident, such as a car accident, or chronic trauma, such as military combat, abuse or chaotic relationships. 

  • Jeb Fowler, PhD Fellow in Psychology

    “Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is diagnosed when clusters of symptoms get in the way of a person living the life they want to over time,” says Dr. Christina Biedermann, staff psychologist at Austen Riggs Center. 

  • Addiction

    The recent New York Times editorial, “If Addiction Is a Disease, Why Is Relapsing a Crime?” explains clearly and succinctly why criminalization of addiction can never be an effective way to reduce drug use, addiction, or death.

  • Austen Riggs offers family therapy to assist family members to understand one another and the family system better, leading to more harmonious and satisfying relationships.

    In April 2018, the Austen Riggs Center held its second Multi-Family Education Workshop, a new initiative that brings family members of current Riggs patients together with Riggs clinical staff members for a day-long educational program. 

  • Jane Tillman, PhD, ABPP

    Jane G. Tillman, PhD, ABPP, Evelyn Stefansson Nef Director of the Erikson Institute for Education and Research, has received a significant grant from the Fund for Psychoanalytic Research through the American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA) for her work, “Follow Up to States of Mind Preceding a Near Lethal Suicide Attempt Study.” In making this award, the review committee indicated that this was an important topic for study and may yield valuable information. 

  • Developing fulfilling relationships is not only a goal for many people who come to Riggs, it is also an integral part of the treatment program itself.

    This year, at the American Psychiatric Association (APA) Annual Meeting, I heard a new catchphrase: "practicing at the top of your license." While I had heard this phrase a few times before, it seemed to be everywhere this year. The context in which this phrase tended to be uttered was when psychiatrists were describing the position that their employers took, when those psychiatrists wanted to provide some form of psychosocial treatment in addition to (or as an alternative to) the model of "15-minute med checks." The implication seemed to be, "you are medically trained, while others are not, so your energies should be devoted exclusively to providing medicine."

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