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Online Courses

Welcome! The Erikson Institute of Austen Riggs Center is pleased to provide online continuing education (CE) / continuing medical education (CME). CE/CME credit is provided through video/audio courses with an emphasis on psychodynamic psychotherapy. CME/CE certificates are provided upon completion. Credit is available for those with an MD, PhD, PsyD and social workers at this time.  All mental health professionals and students are welcome to experience course offerings and can be provided with a certificate of completion. As a registered member of this educational platform, your courses and transcripts are available on demand. REGISTER to have access to courses. Check back to see new course offerings and thank you for browsing.

Attention NY and NJ Social Workers: the Austen Riggs Center is approved as a provider for social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) www.aswb.org, through the Approved Continuing Education (ACE) program. As of January 2021, ACE is accepted in 48 jurisdictions. This does not include the states of New York and New Jersey. Check your state licensing board for further information. For a listing of jurisdictions that accept ACE, please visitwww.aswb.org/ace/ace-jurisdiction-map/.  

Credentialed clinicians and other mental health professionals are invited to join Meaning Matters, an online discussion forum hosted by the Austen Riggs Center, that provides a space to share information and thinking about human behavior and how it is impacted by conscious and unconscious processes, personality and motivational factors, relational dynamics and the meaning of symptoms.

We invite you to raise the topics, concerns, and psychoanalytic ideas that compel, perplex, and even provoke you; we expect it to be a place for thoughtful, interesting conversations for open and inquiring minds. 

We encourage discussion that integrates a psychodynamic perspective with other theoretical approaches and modalities, as well as with research in neuropsychology and neuroscience, developmental psychology, personality, and cognition.

To sign up (free), go to https://groups.google.com/d/forum/meaning-matters-community.

Hannah Wallerstein, PhD, is a Fellow in psychology at the Austen Riggs Center.

MD
1

In the last two decades gender has exploded as a concept—new gender identifications have proliferated, as have new forms of embodiment and possible technological interventions. This rapid change demands new ways of thinking both in and out of the consulting room. How do we understand something that can be at once fluid and yet powerfully fixed, socially inscribed and yet profoundly personal? This two-part lecture will attempt to grapple with these questions, first charting the history of the term gender in order to situate our investigation, and then outlining a theoretical framework for engaging the term’s complexity.  Using the work of Freud, Winnicott, and Loewald, the second lecture will propose to think of gender as a representational form linked to subjective authorization.  It will elaborate implications for thinking about gender variance and transgender phenomena.

Tom Kohut, PhD - Sue and Edgar Wachenheim, III Professor of History, Williams College.

MD
1

This pre-recorded forum uses Thomas Kohut’s recent book, Empathy and the Historical Understanding of the Human Past (Routledge, 2020), as a springboard for an interdisciplinary discussion of empathy and its role in understanding people in the past and in the present. 

Lisa Barksdale-Shaw, JD, PhD is a former Erikson Scholar at the Austen Riggs Center.

MD
1

In this talk, Dr. Barksdale-Shaw confronts how the examination of early modern English renaissance characters in a sixteenth-century drama recovers, remembers, and recovers race in a way that belies the well-crafted narrative in Christopher Marlowe’s The Jew of Malta. Removing him from the margins of this tragedy, she centers Ithadore, a captured and enslaved Turk, who serves as the figure through which she studies the legal repercussions of the violence that surrounds him. As a way to read the character, Dr. Barksdale-Shaw assesses his potential sociopathy and analyzes how the narrative of the play “prosecutes” or makes judgments against the behavior of Ithadore. To determine his relationship to the world, she also considers the dynamics between trauma and the master-servant relationship exists in his role as a bondsman. Further complicating these psychological and legal assessments, Dr. Barksdale-Shaw compares the agency of Marlowe’s Ithadore and Shakespeare’s Aaron the Moor from Titus Andronicus. Overall, this case study offers a way to expand how we contemplate contemporary social relationships, racial capitalism, and labor agreements on the global stage.   

Hannah Zeavin, PhD, presents a Virtual Grand Rounds on April 2, 2021.

MD
1

“Teletherapy In/Of Crisis: COVID-19 One Year On" explores what it means and has meant for both patients and clinicians to have mental health care go remote in the context of a global pandemic. What first appeared to be an emergency measure has continued, crisis becoming norm. This presentation traces the longer history of teletherapy as a shadow practice that is as old as psychoanalysis itself and almost always attends crisis. The talk will point to this history in order to help make sense of remote treatment in our present landscape. 

MD
1

In November 2020, a federal magistrate judge issued a stinging rebuke to the United Behavioral Health division of UnitedHealth Group, the nation's largest behavioral health insurer, saying it could no longer use its overly restrictive guidelines to deny mental health and substance use treatment and compelled them to reprocess over 50,000 claims. In this webinar, three experts with intimate knowledge of the case, Meiram Bendat, Joe Parks, and Eric Plakun, will discuss how the ruling curbs the power of insurance companies to decide what standards of care are appropriate, and provide insights on how caregivers can use the verdict to advance access to care for their patients. This presentation is geared toward all behavioral health service providers, as well as members of the general public seeking better access to mental health services. 

Lisa Nelson will be giving a virtual grand rounds at the Austen Riggs Center.

MD
0

Both the medical and lay literature report an association between increased body weight (obesity) and the risk of chronic disease and premature mortality. But obesity is a heterogeneous category that, as a screening tool, over-estimates the risk for some, while ignoring the risk for others. This presentation will explain the definition and clinical importance of obesity, central obesity and metabolic syndrome. We will discuss how to identify people at risk for chronic disease more effectively, and review simple strategies to improve metabolic health and reduce the risk of developing chronic disease.  

Virtual Grand Rounds with Kerry J. Sulkowicz, MD through Austen Riggs.

MD
1

Dr. Sulkowicz is speaking about some of the emotional challenges that leaders face when their organization is in crisis. He will be drawing upon his work advising leaders over the past 25 years, and especially upon his work during the pandemic.

Drs. Linda Mayes and Steven Southwick present a course on Resilience in a Time of Uncertainty.

MD
1

In this 60 minute webinar, participants will learn about responses to traumatic stress with a focus on resilience. The American Psychological Association defines resilience as “the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy, threats and even significant sources of stress…”

John Oldham, MD presents The Dimensions of Personality.

MD
1

This presentation will focus on the dimensional nature of personality, emphasizing a continuum model from personality styles to personality disorders. The development of the Alternative Model for DSM-5 Personality Disorders will be described, reviewing the hybrid nature of the model that incorporates two dimensional components: 1) level of impairment in functioning, and 2) pathological personality trait domains and trait facets. The utility of the AMPD for routine clinical use will be discussed.

Malin Fors is an Erikson Scholar at the Austen Riggs Center in Stockbridge, MA.

MD
1

This lecture will focus on the seldom-addressed therapeutic dyad in which social privilege favors the patient. Through her matrix of relative privilege, Fors will discuss how social power issues are inevitably negotiated in the therapeutic setting and how this process plays out in transference, countertransference, and resistance. Drawing on empirical research from other areas on how people handle sudden loss of privilege, Fors explores the implications of such disparities and explores playful (versus more narcissistically defensive) ways to handle clinical situations in which a patient is dependent on a socially less-privileged therapist. 

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