HomeBlog

Treatment

  • Psychotherapy

    In this video Director of the Erikson Institute for Education and Research Jane G. Tillman, PhD, ABPP, talks about how psychoanalytic treatment has changed over the years.

  • The Austen Riggs Center provides intensive psychodynamic psychotherapy in a voluntary, open, and non-coercive community.

    The Austen Riggs Center has again been highlighted as one of the best hospitals for 2015-16 in Psychiatry by U.S. News & World Report. The annual U.S. News Best Hospitals rankings recognize hospitals that excel in treating the most challenging patients. 

  • In this five-part series exploring psychotic spectrum disorders, we will present excerpts from a longer interview with Jane G. Tillman, PhD, ABPP, Evelyn Stefansson Nef Director of the Erikson Institute for Education and Research of the Austen Riggs Center, a member of the Riggs clinical staff and an authority on psychotic spectrum disorders. At the end of the series, we will make the interview, in its entirety, available in our Resource Center.

  • The obscurity of trauma

    Let’s take a step back for a moment. What does psychotic mean in the first place? 

    For a lay-person, it means an altered sense of reality, a lack of shared reality with other people. Of course, we all have our own slant on reality, but hopefully we have enough touch points or shared points where we can have what we call a consensual reality.

  • Community meeting

    Austen Riggs held a blog competition among staff members where we asked them to write about the topic: “How My Work Makes a Difference.”  This is the second blog in the series written by Elizabeth Weinberg, MD, Staff Ps

  • Therapeutic Relationship

    All patients begin in an evaluation and treatment phase for the first six weeks of their treatment at a residential or hospital level of care. This time is used to better understand whatever brings them to the Austen Riggs Center.

  • Psychotherapy

    It is harmful to leave bipolar disorder untreated. Not only are there the acute risks of untreated mania (interpersonal chaos, financial and occupational problems, health consequences, and the risk of suicide), but there is also evidence that each manic episode increases the likelihood of successive manic episodes, leading to a long-term worsening of the illness. Optimal treatment of bipolar disorder most often involves certain lifestyle changes, consistent use of mood-stabilizing medications, and psychotherapy.

  • Psychiatric testing

    Treatment of bipolar disorder begins with careful diagnosis. Because bipolar disorder frequently presents first with depression, or because patients with manic or hypomanic states frequently do not recognize themselves as having a problem, accurate diagnosis is frequently delayed. Though historically under-diagnosed, recent research suggests that bipolar disorder is currently over-diagnosed almost half of the time. There are no laboratory tests for bipolar disorder. Diagnosis is made by a detailed appraisal of symptoms and of family history, and by ruling out other conditions that present in similar ways.

  • Therapeutic Community Program Manager at the Austen Riggs Center, Cornelia Kalisher, LSW

    In this six-part series exploring trauma, we will present excerpts from a longer interview with E. Virginia Demos, EdD, a member of the clinical staff at the Austen Riggs Center and an authority on trauma. At the end of the series, we will make the interview, in its entirety, available in our Resource Center. 

  • Consultation

    The final stage is a very cautious, slow, opening up of hope for something different, namely to come out of hiding, and trusting that maybe, just maybe they can be safe in the world beyond the therapy. That can be a terrifying moment, because they have spent years protecting themselves, by not allowing themselves to hope for something, or to trust someone in an intimate relationship.

Pages

Share

|
Subscribe to RSS - Treatment