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Suicide

  • Dr. Katie Lewis is a research psychologist at the Austen Riggs Center.

    A joint team of researchers from the Austen Riggs Center, Long Island University, and Rutgers University hypothesize that for certain psychiatric patients, disturbed sleep negatively impacts daily interactions with others, and those negative interactions can in turn increase the likelihood of suicidal thoughts and behaviors.

  • Image provided by the World Federation for Mental Health.

    World Mental Health Day (WMHD) is today, Thursday, October 10, and the focus this year is suicide prevention. Organized by the World Federation for Mental Health, WMHD helps to raise global awareness about mental health topics and issues. 

    On the WMHD website, we are all invited to join in “‘40 seconds of action’ to raise awareness of the scale of suicide around the world and the role that each of us can play to help prevent it.”

  • Suicide Awareness Month

    Austen Riggs Center staff members Katie Lewis, PhD, and Lee Watroba spoke on local radio programs about suicide prevention awareness. 

  • Celebrating 100 years of lives reclaimed at the Austen Riggs Center in Stockbridge, MA.

    If you are a journalist who covers topics related to suicide, mental health, access to care, the politics/economics of health care, and related issues, this conference will provide you with access to leading thinkers and policy-makers.

  • Austen Riggs Center Participates in Berkshire County Out of Darkness Walk.

    Austen Riggs Center Chief Nursing Officer Cheryl Puntil writes about the importance of talking about suicide, prevention and personal experience.

  • The Austen Riggs Center provides intensive psychodynamic psychotherapy in a voluntary, open, and non-coercive community.

    Austen Riggs Center staff member Barbara Keegan writes about why she donates to Riggs in support of suicide research. 

  • Katie Lewis, PhD, is a research psychologist at the Austen Riggs Center.

    Katie Lewis, PhD, research psychologist at the Austen Riggs Center, has received the competitive Young Investigator Innovation Grant from the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) for her study: “Impact of Interpersonal Experiences on Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors.” Dr. Lewis’ study was one of fewer than ten chosen out of 175 applications. 

  • Austen Riggs Center’s Drs. Elizabeth Weinberg and Katie Lewis offer a clinical perspective on the portrayal of American teens in 13 Reasons Why Season 2.

    Season 2 features an unrelentingly grim teenage environment, in which every teenager is a perpetrator, a victim, or both–in which teens routinely contemplate suicide, engage in exploitative sexual relationships, and attempts to change for the better lead to disaster. While the many depictions of the difficulties that beset the teens in this series reflect issues commonly portrayed in the media, such as opiate addiction, gun violence, bullying, rape, and suicide, there remains a significant difficulty in that 13 Reasons Why seeks to inform teens and their families about these issues, yet persistently treats these issues in highly problematic ways.

  • Austen Riggs Center’s Drs. Elizabeth Weinberg and Katie Lewis offer a clinical perspective on the impact and consequences of 13 Reasons Why Season 2. 

  • In the recent movie Won’t You Be My Neighbor we see how Fred Rogers calmly and brilliantly engages young people in discussion about very difficult subjects, including death.

    In the recent movie Won’t You Be My Neighbor we see how Fred Rogers calmly and brilliantly engages young people in discussion about very difficult subjects, including death. Using his puppet characters, he addressed the assassination of Robert Kennedy and the Challenger explosion. 

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