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Suicide

  • Austen Riggs Center Participates in Berkshire County Out of Darkness Walk.

    Austen Riggs Center Chief Nursing Officer Cheryl Puntil writes about the importance of talking about suicide, prevention and personal experience.

  • The Austen Riggs Center provides intensive psychodynamic psychotherapy in a voluntary, open, and non-coercive community.

    Austen Riggs Center staff member Barbara Keegan writes about why she donates to Riggs in support of suicide research. 

  • Katie Lewis, PhD, is a research psychologist at the Austen Riggs Center.

    Katie Lewis, PhD, research psychologist at the Austen Riggs Center, has received the competitive Young Investigator Innovation Grant from the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) for her study: “Impact of Interpersonal Experiences on Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors.” Dr. Lewis’ study was one of fewer than ten chosen out of 175 applications. 

  • Austen Riggs Center’s Drs. Elizabeth Weinberg and Katie Lewis offer a clinical perspective on the portrayal of American teens in 13 Reasons Why Season 2.

    Season 2 features an unrelentingly grim teenage environment, in which every teenager is a perpetrator, a victim, or both–in which teens routinely contemplate suicide, engage in exploitative sexual relationships, and attempts to change for the better lead to disaster. While the many depictions of the difficulties that beset the teens in this series reflect issues commonly portrayed in the media, such as opiate addiction, gun violence, bullying, rape, and suicide, there remains a significant difficulty in that 13 Reasons Why seeks to inform teens and their families about these issues, yet persistently treats these issues in highly problematic ways.

  • Austen Riggs Center’s Drs. Elizabeth Weinberg and Katie Lewis offer a clinical perspective on the impact and consequences of 13 Reasons Why Season 2. 

  • In the recent movie Won’t You Be My Neighbor we see how Fred Rogers calmly and brilliantly engages young people in discussion about very difficult subjects, including death.

    In the recent movie Won’t You Be My Neighbor we see how Fred Rogers calmly and brilliantly engages young people in discussion about very difficult subjects, including death. Using his puppet characters, he addressed the assassination of Robert Kennedy and the Challenger explosion. 

  • The Austen Riggs Center is focusing some of our research efforts on the issue of suicide.

    Director of the Erikson Institute Dr. Jane G. Tillman and Research Psychologist Dr. Katie Lewis give an overview of the Suicide Research and Education Strategic Initiative at the Austen Riggs Center.

  • Dese’Rae L. Stage gave an interview on suicide prevention and her multi-media suicide survivor portrait and story project Live Through This.

    During a visit to the Austen Riggs Center earlier this year, Dese’Rae L. Stage, photographer, writer, and suicide prevention activist, spoke with us about suicide prevention and Live Through This, a multimedia-based storytelling series that aims to reduce prejudice and discrimination against suicide attempt survivors. 

  • Suicide Awareness Month

    Austen Riggs Center clinician and Director of the Erikson Institute, Dr. Jane G. Tillman, responds to the New York Times article “Suicide Survivor Guilt.”

  • Jane Tillman, PhD, ABPP

    Jane G. Tillman, PhD, ABPP, Evelyn Stefansson Nef Director of the Erikson Institute for Education and Research, has received a significant grant from the Fund for Psychoanalytic Research through the American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA) for her work, “Follow Up to States of Mind Preceding a Near Lethal Suicide Attempt Study.” In making this award, the review committee indicated that this was an important topic for study and may yield valuable information. 

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