HomeBlog

Relationships

  • David Mintz, MD, Team Leader/Staff Psychiatrist at the Austen Riggs Center.

    Austen Riggs Center staff psychiatrist David Mintz, MD, talks about the Psychodynamic Psychopharmacology strategic initiative taking form at Riggs. 

  • Donna Elmendorf, PhD is the director of the Therapeutic Community Program at the Austen Riggs Center.

    Austen Riggs Center Director of the Therapeutic Community Program Donna Elmendorf, PhD, talks about the Human Development Strategic Initiative at Riggs.

  • Austen Riggs Center Admissions Brochure - Learn More.

    Austen Riggs Center Admissions Brocure and Orientation for Families describing treatment for complex psychiatric problems now available online.

  • The Austen Riggs Center treatment approach is based on four-times weekly individual psychotherapy.

    Recently, the Austen Riggs Center Board of Trustees and staff undertook a comprehensive strategic planning process that prioritized a number of initiatives designed to expand our role and positively impact the serious mental health issues we face as a society. These include: clinical systems, human development, biopsychosocial advocacy, suicide research, the neuroscience of psychotherapeutic change, and psychodynamic psychopharmacology. This is the first in a series of blogs that will highlight each of these strategic initiatives.

  • Eric M. Plakun, MD, DLFAPA, FACPsych, Associate Medical Director and Director of Admissions

    Austen Riggs Center Associate Medical Director and Director of Biopsychosocial Advocacy Eric M. Plakun, MD, comments on a Wall Street Journal article about how to know if your therapy is working.

  • The Austen Riggs Center is an open psychiatric treatment setting located in Stockbridge, MA.

    Last week we featured some of our top blogs of 2016. This week, we bring you the rest of the list.

  • Meaning Matters is an online community, hosted by the Austen Riggs Center, that provides a place for mental health professionals and those in related disciplines to share information and thinking about a variety of topics.

    Meaning Matters is an online community, hosted by the Austen Riggs Center, that provides a place for mental health professionals and those in related disciplines to share information and thinking about a variety of topics. These include: human behavior and how it is impacted by conscious and unconscious processes, personality and motivational factors, relational dynamics, and the meaning of symptoms.

  • Austen Riggs Center Medical Director/CEO Andrew J. Gerber, MD, PhD, reflects on recent research findings related to loneliness.

    It is known that being lonely, or on the social perimeter, impacts the way a person behaves and interfaces with the world, and is detrimental to health. People who feel isolated from the world come to dread social interaction opportunities, and unfortunately, this leads to a tendency to spiral even further into loneliness. Now, researchers at the University of Chicago have demonstrated that lonely people process external information differently, and that there are observable neural correlates of the subjective report of loneliness. In particular, lonely people anticipate and are highly sensitive to the negative social interactions and cues that will likely serve to worsen their loneliness.

  • Nancy McWilliams is the Current Erikson Scholar at the Erikson Institution for Education and Research of the Austen Riggs Center.

    During her time at Riggs, Erikson Scholar Nancy McWilliams, PhD, ABPP, focused on two projects: completing the editing of a revised edition of the Psychodynamic Diagnostic Manual (PDM), and working on a book of clinical experience and research that aims, as she explains, “to expand the public conversation about mental health treatment beyond simple symptom reduction.”

  • Division 39 president Marilyn Charles, Ph.D., ABPP

    Recently, I was invited to participate in Boston College University's Counseling Services Colloquium on Loneliness and presented my ideas regarding “Loneliness and the Capacity to be Alone.” This opportunity allowed me (and others) to address the concern that young adults, who, despite being more “connected” than ever, are increasingly isolated and less able to navigate and nurture successful relationships with others. The colloquium also provided the opportunity to reflect upon my work with patients at Riggs who struggle with these same issues.

Pages

Share

|
Subscribe to RSS - Relationships