Online Courses

Online Courses

Welcome! The Erikson Institute of Austen Riggs Center is pleased to provide online continuing education (CE) / continuing medical education (CME). CE/CME credit is provided through video/audio courses with an emphasis on psychodynamic psychotherapy. CME/CE certificates are provided upon completion. Credit is available for those with an MD, PhD, PsyD and social workers at this time.  All mental health professionals and students are welcome to experience course offerings and can be provided with a certificate of completion. As a registered member of this educational platform, your courses and transcripts are available on demand. REGISTER to have access to courses. Check back to see new course offerings and thank you for browsing.

Visit Meaning Matters, an independent psychodynamically oriented community, hosted by the Austen Riggs Center, and available for clinicians and those with a professional interest in psychodynamic thinking. This is a community for professionals looking for informed discussion on a wide variety of clinical practice and applied theory topics, as well as an information source for news articles, a nationwide events calendar, and resources such as papers and presentations.
»Register now for free membership in Meaning Matters 

Edward R. Shapiro, MD, Senior Consultant, Erikson Institute for Education and Research

MD
1

This lecture offers a developmental and contextual view of severe personality disorders. Focusing on the patient's presentation, underlying defenses and countertransference, Dr. Shapiro uses these as entry points into understanding the origins of personality disorders in childhood, and in the interaction between the developing child and the family. With specific examples, he outlines projective identification, object relations theory, the nature of containment and a sequence of treatment options.

MD
1

Stephanie McCrummen, winner of the 2015 Erikson Prize for Excellence in Mental Coverage by the Media, speaks about her approach to journalism that includes “external reporting and internal reporting” and aims to “understand and ask a basic question, which is ‘What is like to be you; what is it really like to be you?’”

William Todd Schultz, 2015 Erikson Institute Prize for Excellence in Mental Health Media Winner.

MD
1

Winner of the 2015 Erikson Prize for Excellence in Mental Coverage by the Media, William Todd Schultz, PhD, explains his approach to psychobiography, in which he uses psychodynamic principles to illuminate something about a his subject’s life that might not be obvious from his/her superficial history and then explore what it means. 

Alison Bechdel

MD
1

Hear Alison Bechdel, winner of the 2015 Erikson Prize for Excellence in Mental Coverage by the Media, speak about her creative process and books Fun Home and Are You My Mother? As she states, "I'm so interested in psychoanalytic ideas, but I want to make them accessible; I want to show how they manifest in the concrete realm of my life."

Edward R. Shapiro, MD, Senior Consultant, Erikson Institute for Education and Research

MD
2

This three-lecture course is an introduction to psychodynamic systems theory. The first lecture focuses on basic principles, beginning with the recognition that the individual is an open system linked to others through the communication of affects, both consciously and unconsciously. With a review of projective identification, we move from the study of the dynamics of the individual to the couple, the family, the group and the organization. I will offer an outline of an interpretive stance and the potential development of an organizational culture that can provide increased access to understanding and using organizational irrationality. The lecture ends with an example of psychodynamic systems thinking about an organization, focusing on psychoanalytic institutes.

Lectures two and three focus on the family as an organization, using excerpts from individual and family treatment to further clarify these systems concepts.

Jane Tillman, PhD, ABPP

MD
1

This course reviews reactions clinicians may have to the suicide of a patient.  Survivors of suicide include family, friends, bystanders, and also mental health professionals working with the person who commits suicide.  Increasingly the suicide of a patient is recognized as an occupational hazard for psychiatrists and other clinicians working with patients at risk for, and completing suicide.  The prevalence of suicide is reviewed along with research showing the unique responses survivors of suicide may have including shame, stigma, need to place blame or experience blame,and other difficult emotions.

Samar Habl, MD, and Cathleen Morey, LICSW

MD
1

In the era of the Affordable Care Act, patient care increasingly involves the use of integrated interdisciplinary treatment models. In this presentation, we will discuss interdisciplinary treatment teams that utilize a psychodynamic systems approach to optimize integration of care for patients with complex psychiatric conditions. 

Elizabeth Weinberg, MD

MD
1

Dr. Elizabeth Weinberg will both give a conceptual and historical overview of the DSM-5 system, and then will give a detailed review of DSM-5.  She will discuss each major chapter, its conceptual organization, major diagnostic categories, and important changes from DSM-IV.  There will be a brief review of the mandatory transition to ICD coding in 2014.

David Mintz, MD

MD
1

Over the past several decades, mental health care has been transformed by the advent of safer, more tolerable, and, perhaps, more effective medications. There is, however, little evidence that this had led to substantially better outcomes. Treatment resistant psychiatric conditions are still too frequently the rule rather than the exception.  

Eric M. Plakun, MD, DLFAPA, FACPsych, Associate Medical Director and Director of Admissions

MD
1

Using an overview of published evidence from epidemiologic, clinical and molecular genetic research, this presentation shows how 3 false assumptions are leading the field astray. These include assumptions that [1] genes and biology are more important than the environment and relationships in mental disorders, [2] patients present with single disorders that respond to single, evidence based treatments, and [3] the best treatments are pills. The presentation then explores the price paid by the field, by society, and by patients and families as a result of these false assumptions. Among the impacts of the false assumptions is the growing problem of treatment resistant disorders. The presentation offers specific psychodynamic principles that respond to and correct the false assumptions in the hope of improving patient outcomes.

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